Skip to content

Oregon Floods Close Rogue Farms

We closed Rogue Farms to the public Sunday afternoon when it became clear that the Willamette River was about to flood the hopyard.

Sure enough, a couple of hours later, the river came flowing in over the main road and into our hop rows.

Here’s what we expect to happen today. The forecast says the river will rise another foot and begin receding tomorrow.

How To Read This Graph: The orange line across the top shows you when we expect flooding here at Rogue Farms. The line of diamonds below it shows you what's average for this time of year.

How To Read This Graph: The orange line across the top shows you when we expect flooding here at Rogue Farms. The line of diamonds below it shows you what’s average for this time of year.

It’s too early to know when we’ll reopen the farm. This has been a tricky flood to predict. The river rose more slowly than first forecasted and may also take longer to recede. It’s all in the hands of Mother Nature.

We’re sending someone out to the farm to get some pictures of what’s going on. Until then, here’s what it looked like last December during a similar flood.

The floods begin when water from the Willamette River flows over Wigrich Road. The current is stronger and deeper than it appears here.

The floods begin when water from the Willamette River flows over Wigrich Road. The current is stronger and deeper than it appears here.

The hopyard fills up quickly. A few years ago it was six feet deep!

The hopyard fills up quickly. A few years ago it was six feet deep!

Don't worry about our Potbellied Pigs Voo and Doo. They are out of the floood plain with plenty of food. They actually like this weather.

Don’t worry about our Potbellied Pigs Voo and Doo. They are out of the floood plain with plenty of food. They actually like this weather.

From our farming perspective, flooding is good. Winter floods are a part of the natural cycle around here and one of the reasons why we have such great terroir for growing hops. Winter floods and rain replenish soil moisture at a time when hops need it the most. They’re especially welcomed after a long drought.

The floods also deposit a new layer of sediment, building up the soil each time they visit. The rich, alluvial loam at Rogue Farms is the legacy of centuries of Ice Age floods and seasonal floods like what we’re experiencing this week. If this is how Mother Nature grows dirt for us, we’re not going to complain.

We’ll let you know when conditions improve and we can reopen the farm. We also recommend calling us ahead of time at 503-838-9813.

When we’re open, drop in and see how rain and floods help us grow beers, spirits, ciders and sodas from ground to glass – good weather or bad. Join us as we Grow The Revolution!

Grow_The_Revolution Logo

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: